Philadelphia Council AFL-CIO

 

Tefere Gebre, Executive Vice-President of the AFL-CIO, writes "our democracy suffers not from voter fraud, but voter suppression and disenfranchisement."
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka issued the statement Thursday while negotiators were meeting behind closed doors for a third straight day.

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The Republicans’ new plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act will confiscate health care benefits from millions of people, hand a big tax break to the wealthy few while taxing working people’s health benefits.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau safeguards Americans against the deceptive and abusive practices of big banks, student loan servicers, credit card companies and predatory lenders.

Recent News

At a press conference held on March 30th at their office in Center City, the Philadelphia Council AFL-CIO announced their unanimous endorsement of Alan Butkovitz. Pat Eiding, President of the Philadelphia Council AFL-CIO opened the press conference saying that Butkovitz “has proven himself to be a tireless advocate for Philadelphians and we are united in our support of his reelection.” Eiding continued, “As City Controller, Alan Butkovitz has worked hard to save taxpayer’s money. Since taking office his work has saved Philadelphians over $800 million.”

AFL-CIO, a leading labor group, fears the Trump administration is planning to roll back a hard-fought worker protection finalized under President Obama. In a statement, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said working people will die if the Trump administration walks back the rule.

Read the full article in The Hill.

Not everybody in West Virginia uses the same health insurance, but everyone’s care is connected, Richard Trumka and Josh Sword write in the Charleston Gazette-Mail. That’s one big reason why the current attack on access to health care is something every West Virginian has a stake in, and why we urge Sen. Shelley Moore Capito to join Sen. Joe Manchin in opposing the American Health Care Act of 2017.

Tucked inside the Republican bill to replace Obamacare is a plan to impose a radical diet on a 52-year-old program that insures nearly one in five Americans.

Read the full article in the New York Times.